#web


To-do List in Google Calendar

It seems that I am find­ing Google Cal­en­dar (cur­rent­ly being referred to as gCal by technopiles) an alter­na­tive to Out­look late­ly. Even though I wish that Google would fin­ish up imple­ment­ing some kind of sync­ing between gCal and Out­look already. But luck­i­ly, there’s a “hack” that helps out in that side of things. I guess its enough to hold me down for a bit till some­thing from Google comes about.

Any­ways, one of the oth­er things that I was hop­ing gCal to have was a sim­ple to-do list(s), aka. Tasks for those Out­look-ori­ent­ed peo­ple. As I was Blin­go-ing for an inte­gra­tion of some kind of to-do list with gCal, this arti­cle was on top of the list by Matias Pelenur. It does the job using JS, GM and Fire­Fox. Although at the moment, it only saves your to-do list per GM install; local­ly that is, per com­put­er. But there are a cou­ple of workarounds that can be done to make it store to ser­vices such as Ama­zon S3, gCal itself, etc. as not­ed by Matias.

Sup­pos­ed­ly, Google men­tioned the avail­abil­i­ty of an “Account Authen­ti­ca­tion Proxy for Web Appli­ca­tions” fea­ture that will be inter­grat­ed with their gCal API in late April… this past April in fact. I guess we’ll just have to wait for an update on Matias about that, or from Google regard­ing their own home-blend­ed to-do list inte­gra­tion with gCal.

TechCrunch Reinvents Itself by Going Green

One of the sites I fre­quent, TechCrunch, has emerged with a redesign.

TechCrunch, found­ed on June 11, 2005, is a weblog ded­i­cat­ed to obses­sive­ly pro­fil­ing and review­ing new web 2.0 prod­ucts and com­pa­nies. In addi­tion to new com­pa­nies, we will pro­file exist­ing com­pa­nies that are mak­ing an impact (com­mer­cial and/or cul­tur­al) on the web 2.0 space. TechCrunch is edit­ed by Michael Arring­ton, who also writes a com­pan­ion blog, Crunch­Notes.

This time around, things seems to be quite green. Oth­er notable fea­tures of the redesign would be that the main-con­tent area got moved from the cen­ter, to the left. Fol­low­ing that, most of the ads were then flanked on the right, which used to be on the left and right sides of the main-con­tent.

I don’t know what it is, but the green skin just reminds me too much of Tech­no­rati’s. Besides that, I think the font-size and line-height improves on usabil­i­ty from the last ver­sion. Although, I kind of am still used to the sub­tle, nat­ur­al col­ors of the last one. Any­ways, con­grats to Michael and cre8d design/Rachel Cun­liffe on the launch.

Con­tin­ue read­ing →

My Findings on coComment and Movable Type 3.2 Integration

coComment

After 12-hours or so of usage and debug­ging my MT tem­plates to prop­er­ly inte­grate with coCom­ment, I final­ly got some­where to say the least. If you need to catchup to what this is all about, you may read my pre­vi­ous arti­cle on what coCom­ment can do.

Any­ways, I final­ly got around fix­ing my Indi­vid­ual Entry Archive tem­plate. I did the fol­low­ing:

Con­tin­ue read­ing →

coComment Helps Us Remember What We’ve Said

I was actu­al­ly think­ing of some­thing like this. I was going to make it my first RoR project but that might just be to ambi­tious. Any­ways, plain and sim­ple,

coCom­ment is the only ser­vice that allows you to enjoy the full poten­tial of blog com­ments on the web. Before coCom­ment, the blo­gos­phere was not a glob­al con­ver­sa­tion, but tons of frag­ment­ed, hard to fol­low, and untrack­able dis­cus­sions.

Using coCom­ment, you can now keep track of what you have been com­ment­ing on, dis­play your com­ments on your blog, and see what is new in the dis­cus­sions you are par­tic­i­pat­ing in (if oth­er users are also on coCom­ment).

One con (at the moment), is that “users can only track com­ments from blog posts that they have actu­al­ly com­ment­ed on, and only com­ments left by oth­er cocom­ment users are shown.“1 But this was a day or so ago. I have to check the new ver­sion out myself as I’ve just signed up a few moments ago.

Along with their news yes­ter­day about ver­sion 0.4c being released, the team also men­tioned the fact that there is now a Fire­fox exten­sion for coCom­ments. This addi­tion, for sure, will make things a bit eas­i­er than hav­ing to use a book­mar­let on the user’s com­put­er.

There might be one small gripe though. As I was tak­ing a look at coCom­men­t’s Blog Inte­gra­tion sec­tion which lists which browsers and blog/CM­S/site-plat­forms it sup­port­ed, I read that Mov­able Type blogs must have the fol­low­ing for­mat,

<title>blog name : article title</title> or
<title>blog name | article title</title>

Oth­er­wise, the com­ment (in coCom­ment) will show up as “(unti­tled)”.

So, see­ing that, there might be an issue of hav­ing every­one involved have a stan­dard way of tem­plat­ing their TITLE-tags. I, for one, see this as a big thing (so it ain’t “small” after all). If this is true, and has­n’t been addressed in it’s next iter­a­tion, coCom­ment is pret­ty much forc­ing every­one to do “this and that.” Then again, we’ll see how this plays out with Micro­for­mats. So if you are listening/reading this oh-Lords-of-coCom­ment, please do let us know. (Then again, I just signed up and haven’t got­ten to play around with coCom­ment that com­plete­ly yet.)

All in all, the ser­vice is prac­ti­cal and very use­ful for those that like to read and inter­act with dif­fer­ent blogs. It’s great for coCom­ment to have got­ten around and imple­ment­ed some­thing use­ful to the mil­lions that are very involved with interblog-inter­ac­tiv­i­ty. In it’s cur­rent state of ver­sion 0.4c, I just can’t wait to see the oth­er fea­tures it will have when it rolls out from “beta”. Pret­ty much, like all the oth­er “Web 2.0” appli­ca­tion-sites. =)

Con­tin­ue read­ing →

  1. Michael Arring­ton, coCom­ment vis­it to Sil­i­con Val­ley []

IE Web Developer Toolbar

Just stum­bled on a link of a link and found that there is too a “web devel­op­er tool­bar” for IE. Although (cur­rent­ly) unrat­ed, it seems to pro­vide some use­ful func­tion­al­i­ty:

  • Explore and mod­i­fy the doc­u­ment object mod­el (DOM) of a web page.
  • Locate and select spe­cif­ic ele­ments on a web page through a vari­ety of tech­niques.
  • Selec­tive­ly dis­able Inter­net Explor­er set­tings.
  • View HTML object class names, ID’s, and details such as link paths, tab index val­ues, and access keys.
  • Out­line tables, table cells, images, or select­ed tags.
  • Val­i­date HTML, CSS, WAI, and RSS web feed links.
  • Dis­play image dimen­sions, file sizes, path infor­ma­tion, and alter­nate (ALT) text.
  • Imme­di­ate­ly resize the brows­er win­dow to 800x600 or a cus­tom size.
  • Selec­tive­ly clear the brows­er cache and saved cook­ies. Choose from all objects or those asso­ci­at­ed with a giv­en domain.
  • Choose direct links to W3C spec­i­fi­ca­tion ref­er­ences, the Inter­net Explor­er team weblog (blog), and oth­er resources.
  • Dis­play a ful­ly fea­tured design ruler to help accu­rate­ly align objects on your pages.

But, don’t go and down­load­ing all at once… after all it is still in beta—“Beta 2” to be exact.