#creatives


Inspiration — Grzegorz Domaradzki

I’ve been fol­low­ing Grze­gorz Domaradzki’s work for a while. His illus­tra­tions just have a hint of clean sketch­i­ness in them (in terms of those lines) that I’ve grown to love. Not only that, he also shows a break­down of his work­flow which def­i­nite­ly adds more of an inter­est­ing twist of how cal­cu­lat­ing his thought process could be fore­seen; only to pro­duce more respect at the works’ qual­i­ty and unique­ness.

Here are some of the ones that I have found awe­some in:
Con­tin­ue read­ing →

Dan Wieden of 2015

Check out this cre­ative job appli­ca­tion video by Yann Cor­lay to Wieden+Kennedy.

YouTube Preview Image

The back-sto­ry:

Tony D here.

Last week i received a jel­ly in the post sup­pos­ed­ly from Dan Wieden. Sealed inside the jel­ly was a plas­tic box with a mem­o­ry stick in it. On load­ing, it played a film of Dan ask­ing me to hire the per­son who real­ly sent the jel­ly.

Talk about effort! The appli­cant had even done his home­work on my jel­ly wob­bling activ­i­ties. His port­fo­lio was also attached. If i’m hon­est the film and appli­ca­tion caught my atten­tion more than the work did, but still worth a cup­pa for all that effort.

Good job Yann! Enter­tain­ing and cre­ative indeed.

PS. Even the Youtube account was on point: “DanWiedenOf2015″ =)

An Ode to UX Designers

One can go to the web and try to find a def­i­n­i­tion for User-Expe­ri­ence Design. They’ll find results such as this:

User expe­ri­ence (UX) is about how a per­son feels about using a prod­uct, sys­tem or ser­vice. User expe­ri­ence high­lights the expe­ri­en­tial, affec­tive, mean­ing­ful and valu­able aspects of human-com­put­er inter­ac­tion and prod­uct own­er­ship, but it also includes a person’s per­cep­tions of the prac­ti­cal aspects such as util­i­ty, ease of use and effi­cien­cy of the sys­tem. User expe­ri­ence is sub­jec­tive in nature, because it is about an individual’s feel­ings and thoughts about the sys­tem. User expe­ri­ence is dynam­ic, because it changes over time as the cir­cum­stances change.

But some­times, ani­ma­tions can do more. Here’s a cou­ple by lyle on Vimeo.

ILUVUXDESIGN Part 1.

ILUVUXDESIGN Part 1.

Source via ILUVUXDESIGN.

Why Most Ideas Get Shot Down

Michael Iva’s man­i­festo, “100 Ways to Kill a Con­cept: Why Most Ideas Get Shot Down”.

So, you’ve got an idea. A big idea. But will your idea take flight? Not if you let your con­cept be killed by all the usu­al excus­es you hear from your man­agers, your boss­es, your spouses—excuses moti­vat­ed by fear or pos­ses­sive­ness. In this wide-rang­ing man­i­festo, Iva offers you ways to per­suade some­one to embrace your idea, to not be swayed by neg­a­tive respons­es, and to uti­lize your cre­ativ­i­ty.

Here’s a list of cir­cum­stances that usu­al­ly fol­lows up once a con­cept is con­ceived:

  1. The boss won’t go for that.
  2. The lawyers won’t go for that.
  3. The accoun­tants won’t go for that.
  4. The client won’t go for that.
  5. The sales­peo­ple won’t go for that.
  6. The investors won’t go for that.
  7. So and so won’t like it.
  8. It’s not us.
  9. It won’t fit into our sys­tem.
  10. We’re not ready for that yet.
  11. I don’t think it will work.
  12. I don’t under­stand.
  13. Do you under­stand?
  14. Will any­one under­stand?
  15. What will they think of next?
  16. It’s polit­i­cal­ly incor­rect.
  17. It’s too com­pli­cat­ed.
  18. It’s too late for that now.
  19. It’s too expen­sive.
  20. We’ll lose mon­ey.
  21. Con­tin­ue read­ing →