#typography


oki-ni Design Competition

logo-oki-ni-20090512

As part of the next phase in the evo­lu­tion of oki-ni (and to make sure that we keep the opin­ions of our cus­tomers at the fore­front of what we’re doing), oki-ni.com are launch­ing a world­wide competition.

We’re look­ing for some­one to design a logo that cap­tures the essence of oki-ni.com in any way, shape or form. We need a graphic image (which can be absolutely any­thing) and a logo which reads oki-ni.com.

The winner/winners (we may use more than one for dif­fer­ent projects that we embark upon) will receive £1000 worth of store credit each to spend on any­thing on the site. All entries should be sub­mit­ted by mid­night on Sun­day 17th May, 2009 Please for­ward all entrants to charlotte@oki-ni.com or post to:

Logo Com­pe­ti­tion
oki-ni.com
20 Gar­rett Street
Lon­don EC1Y 0TW

Good luck!

If you have ques­tions, need details, etc., check­out oki-ni’s Face­book page.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Poster

I never noticed the poster from up close while on the street, but its a very inter­est­ing Design when I finally did. If you haven’t seen the movie at all, you might say that the designer made a mis­take of revers­ing the words. How­ever, if you have, it all makes sense.

The bot­tom line—definitely go see the movie.

curious-case-of-benjamin-button-poster

Source via IMP Awards.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

On Decem­ber 10, 1948 the Gen­eral Assem­bly of the United Nations adopted and pro­claimed the Uni­ver­sal Dec­la­ra­tion of Human Rights the full text of which appears here. Fol­low­ing this his­toric act the Assem­bly called upon all Mem­ber coun­tries to pub­li­cize the text of the Dec­la­ra­tion and “to cause it to be dis­sem­i­nated, dis­played, read and expounded prin­ci­pally in schools and other edu­ca­tional insti­tu­tions, with­out dis­tinc­tion based on the polit­i­cal sta­tus of coun­tries or territories.”

Today, Wednes­day, Decem­ber 10, 2008 marks the 60th anniver­sary of the Assembly’s adap­ta­tion of those Rights.

Con­tinue reading →