#Music


Converse — My Drive Thru

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stechico/2658163212/

In cel­e­bra­tion of its 100 years, 3 artists (San­to­gold, Julian Casablan­cas, and N.E.R.D) came to make a dope track enti­tled “My Drive Thru” (pro­duced by Phar­rell Williams). You may down­load the song in MP3 for­mat by going to Converse’s site.

PS. Make sure to check out the video too (also avail­able on Con­verse site).

Kounandi

While read­ing my emails, I got the TED newslet­ter and read about Rokia Tra­ore per­form­ing “Kounandi”. Then from the com­ments below the video/performance’s post, got linked to a movie also called “Kounandi” (via Emily McManus).

Also learned that “Kounandi” is a name that means “one who brings luck”. The more you know…

Con­tinue reading →

Glow in the Dark Tour

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stechico/2431232915/

kanyeuniversecity.com

Kanye West, co-starring: Rihanna, N.E.R.D, and Lupe Fiasco

Awe­some show. I went to the San Jose HP Pavil­ion one this past Sat­ur­day, 4/19th. Too bad I missed most of Lupe’s. Oh well, I guess I just have to roll and see him in a smaller venue.

Any­ways, this is a dope show/concert to go to—well worth the money and time. I scored an awe­some 4-star VIP tix and sat Front-2, Row-10, Seat-14 right dead-smack cen­ter and aisle.

Every­one was on point w/ their per­for­mances… and didn’t say the wrong city =) (I read that Kanye said “Seat­tle” up in the Sacra­mento Arco Arena show 4/18th)—no love for the Kings haha

The “Amen Break”

YouTube Preview Image
Can I Get An Amen?. Pro­duced by Nate Har­ri­son. 2004.

Can I Get An Amen? is an audio instal­la­tion that unfolds a crit­i­cal per­spec­tive of per­haps the most sam­pled drum beat in the his­tory of recorded music, the Amen Break. It begins with the pop track Amen Brother by 60’s soul band The Win­stons, and traces the trans­for­ma­tion of their drum solo from its orig­i­nal con­text as part of a ‘B’ side vinyl sin­gle into its use as a key aural ingre­di­ent in con­tem­po­rary cul­tural expres­sion. The work attempts to bring into scrutiny the techno-utopian notion that ‘infor­ma­tion wants to be free’- it ques­tions its effec­tive­ness as a democ­ra­tiz­ing agent. This as well as other issues are fore­grounded through a his­tory of the Amen Break and its pecu­liar rela­tion­ship to cur­rent copy­right law.