#life


The Backstory of “The Laughing Heart” Post

It all started with this animation/short film by Bradley Bell:
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In which he inter­preted “The Laugh­ing Heart”, a poem writ­ten by Charles Bukowski, and spo­ken by Tom Waits. This should have been an easy cut-and-paste video/text post on my Tum­blr, where I usu­ally store quick-strike things of inter­est and inspi­ra­tional value. But part of the being of what has been a prod­uct of a Poetry class back in my Undergrad/University days just couldn’t let it go and be done with. The tex­tual for­mat just didn’t have a resound­ing echo to me as it should.

A part of me just wanted much more to come out of each line.1 “Much more,” but not too much; though I have always been intrigued with a lit­tle bit of con­crete poetry.2

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  1. What is a line in Poetry? []
  2. What is con­crete poetry? []

The Mayo Jar

Just want to share this story1 emailed to me by Peter2. I guess it can go hand-in-hand with the ALA Burnout arti­cle tweet ear­lier this week, or Prof. Pausch’s Last Lec­ture.

Enjoy, and have a great week­end my golf balls!

A Pro­fes­sor stood before his phi­los­o­phy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, word­lessly, he picked up a very large and empty may­on­naise jar and pro­ceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the stu­dents if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

So the Pro­fes­sor then picked up a box of peb­bles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The peb­bles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the stu­dents again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The Pro­fes­sor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up every­thing else. He asked once more if the jar was full. The stu­dents responded with an unan­i­mous “yes.”

The Pro­fes­sor then pro­duced two cups of cof­fee from under the table and poured the entire con­tents into the jar, effec­tively fill­ing the space between the grains of sand.

Now,” said the pro­fes­sor, as the laugh­ter sub­sided, “I want you to rec­og­nize that this jar rep­re­sents your life. The golf balls are the impor­tant things—your fam­ily, your chil­dren, your health, your friends, and your favorite passions—things that if every­thing else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

The peb­bles are the other things that mat­ter like your job, your house, and your car. The sand is every­thing else—the small stuff.

If you put the sand into the jar first,” he con­tin­ued, “there is no room for the peb­bles or the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are impor­tant to you. Pay atten­tion to the things that are crit­i­cal to your hap­pi­ness. Play with your chil­dren. Take time to get med­ical check­ups. Take your part­ner out to din­ner. Play another 18.

There will always be time to clean the house and fix the dis­posal. “Take care of the golf balls first, the things that really mat­ter. Set your pri­or­i­ties. The rest is just sand.”

One of the stu­dents raised her hand and inquired what the cof­fee rep­re­sented. The Pro­fes­sor smiled. “I’m glad you asked. It just goes to show you that no mat­ter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a cou­ple of cups of cof­fee with a friend.”

  1. I did some research online and it seems that the story has a ver­sion with 2 cups of cof­fee as well instead of beer. []
  2. If you need some home improve­ments done and live in the Bay Area, Peter can han­dle them. Check out his com­pany over at paloaltohi.com []

Jackie Robinson Steals Home


Jackie Robin­son Steals Home, orig­i­nally uploaded by stechico.

One of the pri­mary rea­sons why I’ve grown to love the Dodgers.

Base­ball World Series

Sub­way Series: Brook­lyn Dodger Jackie Robin­son charg­ing wildy fr. 3rd base as unwary NY Yan­kee catcher Yogi Berra squats behind Dodger bat­ter dur­ing Jackie’s steal of home plate in the 8th inning of the 1st game of the World Series at Yan­kee Stadium.

Loca­tion: New York, NYUS
Date taken: Sep­tem­ber 28, 1955
Pho­tog­ra­pher: Ralph Morse

This photo is from the LIFE photo archive hosted Google here. It’s very nice of them to do this as more peo­ple can reflect back to the great images that Life has taken over the years.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

On Decem­ber 10, 1948 the Gen­eral Assem­bly of the United Nations adopted and pro­claimed the Uni­ver­sal Dec­la­ra­tion of Human Rights the full text of which appears here. Fol­low­ing this his­toric act the Assem­bly called upon all Mem­ber coun­tries to pub­li­cize the text of the Dec­la­ra­tion and “to cause it to be dis­sem­i­nated, dis­played, read and expounded prin­ci­pally in schools and other edu­ca­tional insti­tu­tions, with­out dis­tinc­tion based on the polit­i­cal sta­tus of coun­tries or territories.”

Today, Wednes­day, Decem­ber 10, 2008 marks the 60th anniver­sary of the Assembly’s adap­ta­tion of those Rights.

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