#inspiration


Inspiration — Grzegorz Domaradzki

I’ve been fol­low­ing Grze­gorz Domaradzki’s work for a while. His illus­tra­tions just have a hint of clean sketch­i­ness in them (in terms of those lines) that I’ve grown to love. Not only that, he also shows a break­down of his work­flow which def­i­nitely adds more of an inter­est­ing twist of how cal­cu­lat­ing his thought process could be fore­seen; only to pro­duce more respect at the works’ qual­ity and uniqueness.

Here are some of the ones that I have found awe­some in:
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Inspiration — Karmin, Crash Your Party on the Radio

In the spirit of awe­some reac­tions, how would you react hear­ing your song on the radio for the first time? Here’s how Karmin expe­ri­enced their moment.

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Also, dig­gin’ that track. Can’t wait to hear more from this duo. And for every­one else on the grind, keep on—chase dreams!

Natsumi Hayashi, Float-ography

Nat­sumi Hayashi is a Tokyo-based pho­tog­ra­pher who started a series of lev­i­tat­ing self-portraits. I, myself, have been tag­ging these (i.e. “jump” shots) in my Flickr col­lec­tion. I’ve been encour­ag­ing friends and fam­ily to do this often as its just an escape from the norm. Though it’s some­what dis­tant from what Nat­sumi Hayashi has done with her series, it’s nice to see her col­lec­tion and work.

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The Backstory of “The Laughing Heart” Post

It all started with this animation/short film by Bradley Bell:
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In which he inter­preted “The Laugh­ing Heart”, a poem writ­ten by Charles Bukowski, and spo­ken by Tom Waits. This should have been an easy cut-and-paste video/text post on my Tum­blr, where I usu­ally store quick-strike things of inter­est and inspi­ra­tional value. But part of the being of what has been a prod­uct of a Poetry class back in my Undergrad/University days just couldn’t let it go and be done with. The tex­tual for­mat just didn’t have a resound­ing echo to me as it should.

A part of me just wanted much more to come out of each line.1 “Much more,” but not too much; though I have always been intrigued with a lit­tle bit of con­crete poetry.2

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  1. What is a line in Poetry? []
  2. What is con­crete poetry? []