#ideas


Why Most Ideas Get Shot Down

Michael Iva’s man­i­festo, “100 Ways to Kill a Con­cept: Why Most Ideas Get Shot Down”.

So, you’ve got an idea. A big idea. But will your idea take flight? Not if you let your con­cept be killed by all the usual excuses you hear from your man­agers, your bosses, your spouses—excuses moti­vated by fear or pos­ses­sive­ness. In this wide-ranging man­i­festo, Iva offers you ways to per­suade some­one to embrace your idea, to not be swayed by neg­a­tive responses, and to uti­lize your creativity.

Here’s a list of cir­cum­stances that usu­ally fol­lows up once a con­cept is conceived:

  1. The boss won’t go for that.
  2. The lawyers won’t go for that.
  3. The accoun­tants won’t go for that.
  4. The client won’t go for that.
  5. The sales­peo­ple won’t go for that.
  6. The investors won’t go for that.
  7. So and so won’t like it.
  8. It’s not us.
  9. It won’t fit into our system.
  10. We’re not ready for that yet.
  11. I don’t think it will work.
  12. I don’t understand.
  13. Do you understand?
  14. Will any­one understand?
  15. What will they think of next?
  16. It’s polit­i­cally incorrect.
  17. It’s too complicated.
  18. It’s too late for that now.
  19. It’s too expensive.
  20. We’ll lose money.
  21. Con­tinue reading →

Keep Remixing! It’s The Future.

Film­maker Brett Gay­lor explores issues of copy­right in the infor­ma­tion age, mash­ing up the media land­scape of the 20th cen­tury and shat­ter­ing the wall between users and producers.

Watch “RiP! A Remix Man­i­festo” here on Hulu.

PS. If you haven’t yet, down­load Girl Talk’s All Day here for FREE!

Things I Have Learned In My Life So Far by Stefan Sagmeister

I was inter­ested enough to check this out from a TED newslet­ter. Pretty inter­est­ing TED Talk by Ste­fan Sag­meis­ter.

Ste­fan Sag­meis­ter is no mere com­mer­cial gun for hire. Sure, he’s cre­ated eye-catching graph­ics for clients includ­ing the Rolling Stones and Lou Reed, but he pours his heart and soul into every piece of work. His design work is at once time­less and of the moment, and his painstak­ing atten­tion to the small­est details cre­ates work that offers some­thing new every time you look at it.

While a sense of humor invari­ably sur­faces in his designs, Sag­meis­ter is nonethe­less very seri­ous about his work; his inti­mate approach and sin­cere thought­ful­ness ele­vate his design. A gen­uine mav­er­ick, Sag­meis­ter achieved noto­ri­ety in the 1990s as the designer who self-harmed in the name of craft: He cre­ated a poster adver­tis­ing a speak­ing engage­ment by carv­ing the salient details onto his torso.

Some of the points he high­lighted in his TED talk were:

  • Help­ing other peo­ple helps me.
  • Hav­ing guts always works out for me.
  • Think­ing life will be bet­ter in the future is stu­pid. I have to live now.
  • Start­ing a char­ity is sur­pris­ingly easy.
  • Being not truth­ful works against me.
  • Every­thing I do always comes back to me.
  • Assum­ing is stifling.
  • Drugs feel great in the begin­ning and become a drag later on.
  • Over time I get used to every­thing and start tak­ing for granted.
  • Money does not make me happy.
  • Trav­el­ing alone is help­ful for a new per­spec­tive on life.
  • Keep­ing a diary sup­ports per­sonal development.
  • Try­ing to look good lim­its my life.
  • Mate­r­ial lux­u­ries are best enjoyed in small doses.
  • Wor­ry­ing solves nothing.
  • Com­plain­ing is silly. either act or forget.
  • Actu­ally doing the things I set out to do increases my over­all level of satisfaction.
  • Every­body thinks they are right.
  • Low expec­ta­tions are a good strategy.
  • What­ever I want to explore pro­fes­sion­ally, its best to try it out for myself first.
  • Every­body who is hon­est is interesting.

There’s also a com­mu­nity site ded­i­cated to Things I Have Learned In My Life in which you may con­tribute, share, and hear other people’s life lessons.

PS. Thanks to Marco de Jong for sum­ma­riz­ing them on the TED Talk page.

Google’s Project 10^100

YouTube Preview Image

Project 10100 is a call for ideas to change the world by help­ing as many peo­ple as possible.

Here are the points in order to participate:

  1. Sub­mit your ideas by Octo­ber 20th. You may do so by using this sub­mis­sion form.
  2. Vot­ing takes place on Jan­u­ary 27, 2009. Google will be pick­ing the top 100 ideas, of which 20 semi-finalists will be selected through pub­lic vot­ing. From there, Google advi­sory board will then select up to 5 final ideas.
  3. After the final ideas have been picked, Google will bring them to life. They will com­mit $10-million to imple­ment the projects.

I like how Google is doing this. Hope­fully, its suc­cess­ful enough that not only a lot of peo­ple con­ceive great ideas but also help the World. If any, I wouldn’t be a bit sur­prised if those 5 or so final­ist show up on TED Talks.

More details avail­able at project10tothe100.com. Good luck every­one! Let’s change the World positively.

Google Chrome’s Logo Inspiration from Pokemon?

As I was try­ing to con­firm my hunch about Chrome and the Poke­mon ball look­ing the same, I ran into a search result in Flickr which led me to Cole Hen­ley’s image above. Awe­some. I am not alone1.

  1. Although, I don’t know about the Simon Says part but it wouldn’t hurt. []