#comments


Separate Pings/Trackbacks from Total Comment Count in WordPress

After tak­ing a look at some search results and at Matt Martz’ arti­cle, Sep­a­rat­ing Pings from Com­ments in Word­Press 2.7, I still had some issues with par­tic­u­larly the com­ment count. There were also a prob­lem with how the func­tions I have added/modified are being car­ried across in my tem­plates (but prob­a­bly are mostly in the scope of this Blue­print theme). The files that we’re mostly going to deal with are these ones: comments.php, functions.php and single.php.

Any­ways, I just want to note here how I took care of them and what I ended up with.

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MSNBC Keith Olbermann on California’s Prop. 8

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Some take­aways from Olbermann’s Spe­cial Com­ment on California’s Prop. 8:

  • What is it to you?”
  • They want what you want.”
  • Spread hap­pi­ness.”
  • Do onto oth­ers as you would have them do onto you1.”
  1. The Golden Rule. Also known as the Ethic of Reci­procity. []

coComment Helps Us Remember What We’ve Said

I was actu­ally think­ing of some­thing like this. I was going to make it my first RoR project but that might just be to ambi­tious. Any­ways, plain and simple,

coCom­ment is the only ser­vice that allows you to enjoy the full poten­tial of blog com­ments on the web. Before coCom­ment, the blo­gos­phere was not a global con­ver­sa­tion, but tons of frag­mented, hard to fol­low, and untrack­able discussions.

Using coCom­ment, you can now keep track of what you have been com­ment­ing on, dis­play your com­ments on your blog, and see what is new in the dis­cus­sions you are par­tic­i­pat­ing in (if other users are also on coComment).

One con (at the moment), is that “users can only track com­ments from blog posts that they have actu­ally com­mented on, and only com­ments left by other cocom­ment users are shown.“1 But this was a day or so ago. I have to check the new ver­sion out myself as I’ve just signed up a few moments ago.

Along with their news yes­ter­day about ver­sion 0.4c being released, the team also men­tioned the fact that there is now a Fire­fox exten­sion for coCom­ments. This addi­tion, for sure, will make things a bit eas­ier than hav­ing to use a book­mar­let on the user’s com­puter.

There might be one small gripe though. As I was tak­ing a look at coComment’s Blog Inte­gra­tion sec­tion which lists which browsers and blog/CMS/site-platforms it sup­ported, I read that Mov­able Type blogs must have the fol­low­ing format,

<title>blog name : article title</title> or
<title>blog name | article title</title>

Oth­er­wise, the com­ment (in coCom­ment) will show up as “(untitled)”.

So, see­ing that, there might be an issue of hav­ing every­one involved have a stan­dard way of tem­plat­ing their TITLE-tags. I, for one, see this as a big thing (so it ain’t “small” after all). If this is true, and hasn’t been addressed in it’s next iter­a­tion, coCom­ment is pretty much forc­ing every­one to do “this and that.” Then again, we’ll see how this plays out with Micro­for­mats. So if you are listening/reading this oh-Lords-of-coComment, please do let us know. (Then again, I just signed up and haven’t got­ten to play around with coCom­ment that com­pletely yet.)

All in all, the ser­vice is prac­ti­cal and very use­ful for those that like to read and inter­act with dif­fer­ent blogs. It’s great for coCom­ment to have got­ten around and imple­mented some­thing use­ful to the mil­lions that are very involved with interblog-interactivity. In it’s cur­rent state of ver­sion 0.4c, I just can’t wait to see the other fea­tures it will have when it rolls out from “beta”. Pretty much, like all the other “Web 2.0″ application-sites. =)

Con­tinue reading →

  1. Michael Arring­ton, coCom­ment visit to Sil­i­con Val­ley []